In mid August of 1909, Mr. and Mrs. E. Nelson Fell had friends for supper at their home, Creedmoor, where Mr. Harry Lee Edmonds was chosen as the first Master of Foxhounds for what was to become Casanova Hunt. Mr. Edmonds is pictured at the far right in the above photograph from 1909.

Casanova Hunt has always taken great pride in its “working farmer” heritage. Organized by a group of foxhunting farmers, avid sportsmen, who wanted to do their hunting closer to home; the ties to the land and the community remain strong. Many descendants of the founding families remain involved with the hunt today.

After a few years of enjoyable sport, hunting was discontinued during World War I. From 1914 to 1919 the community suffered along with the Nation during wartime. After the war ended, Casanova Hunt was reactivated and hunting resumed. During 1925 to 1927 Casanova Hunt loaned its territory to its good neighbors and friends of Warrenton Hunt. Both clubs alternated hunting the country. Historically both hunts share a long-standing friendship.

Hunting in Casanova was re-established in 1927 with Miss Charlotte Nourse as the first woman to serve as a Master of Foxhounds. Miss Nourse descended from generations of foxhunters. Her Great Grand-father, Samuel Morris, founded the Rose Tree Foxhunting Club (the first organized foxhunting club in America) in 1859. She was one of four children of Charles Joseph Nourse, Jr., of Weston. Originally a two story log cabin, Weston was built on property granted to Giles Fitzhugh in 1753. Charles Joseph Nourse, Jr. purchased the property in 1859 and over the years, made many changes. Nourse’s daughter, Charlotte was an avid horsewoman and during her mastership the hounds were kept in a small yard out the back door of the house. Miss Charlotte, as she was affectionately known, died and left “Weston” to the Warrenton Antiquarian Society. Today Weston is a private residence, museum and home to the Casanova Hunt Hounds.

Another important forefather of Casanova Hunt was Mr. Oscar Beach. Mr. Beach was a farmer and family man who served as Honorary Huntsman for Casanova from 1928 to 1952. Mr. Beach served with Miss Nourse during the formative early years of the Hunt. Both were bold riders, good hunting friends, and served many seasons together, providing good sport and establishing the traditions of the Hunt which carry through today. Mr. Beach’s role in and contributions to the sport of foxhunting were indispensable to Casanova Hunt. He was a hound man, and his keen fox sense and unmatched courage exhibited in traversing the countryside in pursuit of the fox made him one of the outstanding huntsmen of his time. Hunting primarily American Hounds, his keen and efficient pack provided sport to many well known foxhunters. From time to time, the grand master of all fox-hunting, Mr. Harry Worchester Smith, would travel from Middleburg to enjoy the sport provided by the Casanova Hounds. With his great wit, personality, and statesman-like diplomacy, Oscar Beach was respected and much admired both in foxhunting circles and by the local community. Mr. Beach was inducted into the Huntsman’s Room at the Museum of Hounds & Hunting N A, located at Morven Park in Leesburg, Virginia in 1999.

Mr. Harry Edmonds, Master of Foxhounds and Miss Charlotte Nourse, Master of Foxhounds. Miss Norse was from Weston and the first lady Master to be appointed to serve Casanova Hunt in the twenties. These two are shown out enjoying a day of hunting together.

Mr. Harry Edmonds, Master of Foxhounds and Miss Charlotte Nourse, Master of Foxhounds. Miss Norse was from Weston and the first lady Master to be appointed to serve Casanova Hunt in the twenties. These two are shown out enjoying a day of hunting together.

Miss Charlotte Nourse, Master of Foxhounds and Mr. Oscar Beach, Huntsman, shown on the porch of Weston in the twenties.

Miss Charlotte Nourse, Master of Foxhounds and Mr. Oscar Beach, Huntsman, shown on the porch of Weston in the twenties.